The Alchemist

The Alchemist Paulo Coelho: The Alchemist

Der Alchimist ist ein Roman des brasilianischen Schriftstellers Paulo Coelho. Er erschien unter dem Originaltitel „O Alquimista“. Die deutsche Erstausgabe erschien im Verlag Peter Erd. Der Roman verkaufte sich zwar gut, war aber lange. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho continues to change the lives of its readers forever. With more than two million copies sold. With more than two million copies sold around the world, The Alchemist has established itself as a modern classic, universally admired. Paulo Coelho's. Der Alchimist ist ein Roman des brasilianischen Schriftstellers Paulo Coelho. Er erschien unter dem Originaltitel „O Alquimista“. Die deutsche Erstausgabe. Alchemist oder Alchimist (von altägyptisch khem für „schwarz“) steht für: Alchemie praktizierende Person; Alchemist (Band), australische Metal-Band.

The Alchemist

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho continues to change the lives of its readers forever. With more than two million copies sold around the world, The Alchemist has. Der Alchimist ist ein Roman des brasilianischen Schriftstellers Paulo Coelho. Er erschien unter dem Originaltitel „O Alquimista“. Die deutsche Erstausgabe. Alchemist oder Alchimist (von altägyptisch khem für „schwarz“) steht für: Alchemie praktizierende Person; Alchemist (Band), australische Metal-Band.

Start your review of The Alchemist. Really, I did this so you don't have to. Shelves: novellas. My heart and I chatted, and we agreed, this book was short.

My heart thinks it was also stupid, and after spending some time talking to the wind, I came to agree with my heart.

Yet, after beginning the journey with this book and despite the words of my heart, something impelled me to continue.

Surely it had something to teach me? The book had a lovely cover made of nicely textured stock that felt good in my hands.

It offered the added efficiency of a fold-over flap--something that more publisher My heart and I chatted, and we agreed, this book was short.

It offered the added efficiency of a fold-over flap--something that more publishers should make an effort to do, as it makes the use of a bookmark superfluous.

In this case, this is especially true. The prose turned out to be not nearly as nicely textured.

That is irony. This book knows not of irony. Still, though, I needed to complete my journey. My heart tugged on my sleeve. As I continued my journey, I found that the text inside was set in a pleasing font.

I could find no typos, which are always a portent of doom. So I kept going. I found the words that the font expressed were simple and easy to read.

As I read them before falling to sleep each night, they neither challenged me nor troubled my dreams. Many people, I believe, enjoy this in a book, in the same way that they enjoy Hostess Twinkies.

They are filled up with calories, which causes their bodies to believe that they have been fed a nutritious meal, when in fact their brains are lulled into sheep-like somnambulism.

They grow fat and stupid er under the illusion that they have received nutrition without ever experiencing the pain of having to cook, and possibly work up a sweat or burn one's fingers.

I wondered if this book was possibly dangerous. I wondered what kind of people would be deluded into thinking, within the guise of a poorly written but deviously well-conceived parable, that this book's philosophy was, in fact, Deep and Meaningful Truth.

This book, I felt, was perhaps insidiously evil, a force with which I needed to do battle. I did not know which weapon to use, as irony appears to be rendered completely ineffective within a 3-metre radius of this book.

Still, irony and a love of absurdity hovered around me as I searched for the true meaning in this book, and why it appears to offer a powerful message to so many.

I consulted the Oracle, known across all the lands by many names. Now, there's an alchemist for you: Queen Wiki can turn knowledge into nonsense and then back again before your very eyes.

The perfect Oracle for this book. Queen Wiki turned out to be very entertaining and illuminating in this case.

I learned that Joe Jonas and Russell Crowe loved this book. I glommed on to this as an omen that absurdity was lurking close. I interpreted it as a sign that I must continue.

Again, I was struck by the irony of that, but turning back to the book, this fleeting insight that might have had a grain of real value was immediately squelched.

I sipped some sweet tea from a crystal goblet, and plodded on through the desert of thought that is this book. This, I felt, was the lesson to be learned: in the Middle of the Centre of the Soul of the World, where blank-eyed acolytes are led like sheep?

Absurdity goes unrecognized. Skepticism is turned back at the gates by ill-formed philosophies based on the unwavering power of evangelical groupthink and our species' rather fascinating susceptibility to cognitive bias, or errors in thinking, that cause us to believe as truth that which can actually be scientifically validated as false.

This book makes a mockery of spirituality and the search for truth and meaning, under the guise of the easy, anxiety-quelling New Age philosophies that spoon-feed the stupid with Twitter-sized bites of nonsense.

Beliefs like, "good things happen to good people. If it's not right, it's not the end. Do not trade or give away--you'll just be spreading the bullshit.

My heart will go on. View all comments. I need to start this review by stating 1 I can't stand self-help books and 2 I'm a feminist no, I don't hate men- some men are quite awesome, but I am very conscious of women and our place in the world.

Short summary mild spoilers : A boy named Santiago follows his 'Personal Legend' in traveling from Spain to the Pyramids in Egypt searching for treasure.

Along the way, he learns 'the Language of the World' the 'Soul of the World' and discovers that the 'Soul of God' is 'his own soul.

If you think they are hokey and silly, then you'll think this is a terrible book. If you think statements such as "When you want something, all the universe conspires you to achieve it" and "All things are one" are moving and life-changing, you'll love this book.

If such statements have you rolling your eyes, then this isn't your cup of tea. Its not that I find anything wrong with these messages.

They are important, but must be balanced with responsibility. In my experience, 'following your dreams' or personal legend is not the only way toward wisdom and strength.

Is the person who struggles to put food on the table every day for his or her family, consciously realizing that he or she may not be following his or her 'personal legend' any less heroic than some traveler who leaves everything and everyone he or she is responsible for to go on a spiritual quest?

Coelho comes close to labeling such people, as losers in life, which I find completely off the mark as some of these people have the most to offer in terms of wisdom.

The issue of responsibility is also part of this book's sexism. The main male characters in the novel have 'Personal Legends' - they are either seeking them, or have achieved them, or have failed to achieve them.

But Coelho never mentions 'Personal Legend' with regard to women, other than to say that Fatima, Santiago's fiance, is 'a part of Santiago's Personal Legend.

Instead of traveling to find her dreams, she is content to sit around, do chores, and stare everyday at the desert to wait for his return.

This is her 'fate' as a desert women. The fact that women don't have Personal Legends is even more galling considering the fact that according to Coelho, even minerals such as lead and copper have Personal Legends, allowing them to 'evolve' to something better ie, gold.

In the ideal world presented in THE ALCHEMIST, it seems that the job of men is to seek out their personal legends, leaving aside thoughts of family and responsibility, and its the job of women to let them, and pine for their return.

Of course, someone has to do the unheroic, inconvenient work of taking care of the children, the animals, the elderly, the ill If everyone simply goes off on spiritual quests, deciding they have no responsibility other than to seek their Personal Legends, no one would be taking responsibility for the unglamorous work that simply has to take place for the world to run.

On the other hand, what if both men and women are allowed to struggle towards their 'Personal Legends,' and help each other as best as they can towards them, but recognize that their responsibilities may force them to defer, compromise, or even 'sacrifice' their dreams?

This may seem depressing, but it isn't necessarily. Coelho seems to think that Personal Legends are fixed at childhood or at birth, or even before and are not changeable: they have to be followed through to the end, no matter how silly.

But in my experience, many people have chosen to adjust, compromise, and even 'give up' on their dreams, only to find that life grants them something better, or they have a new, better dream to follow, a path providing greater wisdom.

I really disliked this book. I dislike it in the way that I dislike a great deal of modern self help books. Their basic message is that if you want something to happen, you need to want it as hard as you can, without caring about anything else, not allowing yourself to doubt it, or let criticisms will get in the way then it will happen.

I disagree with this notion, not only because it is false, but because it is bad. Just because we desire something, does not make it good.

This idea of 'following I really disliked this book. This idea of 'following your heart' is often wrong. Who are we to be the arbiters of truth?

Why should our hearts be sources of information that go beyond logic, doubt and reasoning? Haven't we all desired things that have turned out to not be in our best interest, or to be harmful to others?

Andrew Jackson was a man known to have a lot of integrity. He was always 'true' to himself and followed his heart. Andrew Jackson is the man who initiated the 'Trail of Tears'.

Moving Native Americans from their homes and into reservations. Next, this idea of not letting ourselves doubt or consider doubts. This is a terrible and dishonest way to live.

If we don't consider doubts, and entertain them often, then we are deliberately blinding ourselves. Deliberately making ourselves ignorant.

If someone doesn't give serious consideration to the idea that they may be wrong. Give serious thought to why they believe what they do, and that perhaps those who doubt them may be correct, then they are behaving in a dangerous and dishonest way.

Not giving heed to the concerns doubts and criticisms of others is something I believe is a major fault in modern society. Often, people fail to recognize the needs of the group and the community.

We place so much emphasis on the needs and rights of the individual. This causes people to focus so much on themselves to the detriment of others around them.

At times, it can be beneficial to go against the group, but one should first give serious consideration to the groups concerns. These are people who take a totally irrational stance, and stick to it as hard as they can in complete defiance to the views of everyone around them.

A good parable--like "The Prodigal Son"--should comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. The problem with this little book is that it does precisely the opposite.

Coelho's message--and, boy, is this a book with a message--is that each of us has his own Personal Legend, and that if we recognize that legend and pursue it sincerely, everything in the Universe which is after all made up--wind, stone, trees--of the same stuff we are will conspire to help us achieve it.

Corollaries: 1 peop A good parable--like "The Prodigal Son"--should comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Corollaries: 1 people who don't recognize their legends are never happy, 2 people who fail to realize their legends are afraid, and 3 people who refuse to pursue their legends, even when they know what they are, are both unhappy and afraid.

I admit I've left out a nuance or two here and there, but not many. There aren't more than three or four nuances in the book. I fear that the result of taking such a message seriously will be to make the successful even more self-satisfied, the narcissistic more self-absorbed, and the affluent more self-congratulatory.

At the same time, those who are unfortunate will blame themselves for their bad fortune, those who lack self-esteem will lose what little they have, and the poor will see--no, not God, as the beatitude says, but--the poor will see they have only themselves to blame.

Perhaps I am being too harsh. I can see how a few individual young persons, hemmed in by parental expectations and seeking their own paths, may find enough hope and courage here to help them venture forth.

But I am convinced the damage done by books like this--like The Secret , The Celestine Prophecy , and anything ever written by the late Dr. Wayne Dyer or, for that matter, anything he may ever choose to channel from beyond the grave --is far greater than the little good they may achieve.

If you like parables, don't read this book. Go read a book of Hasidic tales collected by Martin Buber, a book of Sufi stories collected by Idries Shah, or a book of parables and sayings by Anthony de Mello instead.

Or then again, you could just try Jesus. Jesus is always good. I know that translation affects the quality of writing, but I could not get into this writing style.

At all. I felt like it was totally affected and contrived. The parable-like quality was totally contrived, and I thought the "moral" was pretty stupid.

Moral: everything you want and need is close to home. Take chances. Follow your "personal legacy. Granted, I am not religious. I think god-fearing people get more out of this bc they can take that leap of faith, excuse the phrase.

If this was supposed to be a story of magic, I may have been into it. But it was supposed to be a simple story of knowing yourself.

And I think, philosophically speaking, when you truly know yourself that is when you truly realize your destiny. Why do you need supernatural forces to convey that message?

This was about realizing your destiny, or "personal legacy. In short, the book attempted to be deep and failed. A character simply called "boy" and short sentences doesn't make a story a fable.

Learning from your flocks and from nature doesn't make a character inexplicably wise. I really got nothing out of this book.

It is short though. The book came very highly recommended. Read it to judge the hype for yourself. After all, a whole nation, including Bill Clinton who I'm into , thought it was a touching account that personally changed them.

Then again, this is the same country who thought The Celestine Prophesy was worthwhile. Santiago's journey and spiritual quest, the people he meets, the dreams he has, the omens he encounters, and the nature he speaks to, are all things that we can relate to..

It is all about finding your Pe "when you really want something, the whole universe conspires in helping you to achieve it" This book has crossed the boundaries of books, and has taken a life of its own, creating a movement all around the globe.

It is all about finding your Personal Legend and pursuing your dream regardless of any hurdles, and about being spiritually connected to the universe, which is part of us, and part of God.

Reading this book always sets me back on the right path towards achieving the dreams I have put on hold. We always try to do what everyone expects of us like pursuing a career that you hate just because that is what everyone does.

It is maktub that Coelho writes this book, shares it with the world, and affect so many lives. This masterwork is a legend and a precious treasure.

View all 35 comments. Utter drivel. The book was badly written, righteous, condescending, preachy, and worst of all, the ending was morally questionable.

All the fables and stories are stolen from elsewhere, religious ideas and spirituality are badly mixed, and everything is so obvious. The book harps on about tapping into the Soul of the World, the Language of the World, about your one true path and other nonsense.

The basic idea is that if you really want something and "listen to your heart", the whole universe will Utter drivel. The basic idea is that if you really want something and "listen to your heart", the whole universe will help you achieve it if you only look for omens.

A questionable idea in a world where people no longer want to work hard and achieve independently. It reads like a really bad self-help book written for 8 year old children and disguised as a symbolic parable.

I read a lot of books and I can safely say this is the worst book I have ever read. It's only saving grace was that it was mercifully short.

The problem with this book is not just that it's bad, which it certainly is, but that there are so many people out there who want to corner you at parties and tell you how it's totally changed their lives.

The profound lessons you'll learn from this book amount to nothing more than several variations on the theme of "only The problem with this book is not just that it's bad, which it certainly is, but that there are so many people out there who want to corner you at parties and tell you how it's totally changed their lives.

The profound lessons you'll learn from this book amount to nothing more than several variations on the theme of "only the very ugly is truly beautiful, only the very stupid are really intelligent, only black is white, only up is down" etc etc.

The writing is too simple to be really bad, but it's the content that gets you. By the end of the book you'll want to track down the philosopher's stone yourself and carefully beat Coelho to death with it.

I read this book about three years ago and just had to re-read it for book club. It was a steaming pile of crap then and, guess what?

The main reason I hate this book: it's trite inspirational literature dressed up as an adventure quest. You go into it thinking that it's going to be about a boy's quest for treasure.

If you read the back, there are words like "Pyramids," "Gypsy," "alchemist. It's Hallmark Hall of Fame territory set in an exotic locale.

Which pisses me off to no end as I normally try to dodge that sort of thing, but here it is masquerading as the type of book I normally like.

It's cliche, didactic, and poorly written. Just as with Aesop's Fables , there's a moral to the story. And Coelho keeps backing up and running over it just to make sure that we get it and he capitalizes important key words necessary to understanding it, lest we overlook their significance.

If there's one thing Paulo Coelho can do, it's flog a dead horse. Essentially, boy thinks he's happy in life. He's a shepherd who gets to travel the world, has all of his needs met, and owns a book which he can always trade for another book when he goes to market.

What more can a boy need? Boy is then told by a mysterious stranger that he's not happy at all. Why not? He has failed to recognize his Personal Legend.

Everyone has a Personal Legend, which is life's plan for you. However, most of us give up on our Personal Legend in childhood.

If you are fortunate enough to hang onto and pursue your Personal Legend, then The Soul of the World will help you obtain it. All of nature conspires to bring you luck and good fortune so that you can fulfill your destiny, whether it's to be a shepherd on a quest for treasure at the pyramids, a butcher, a baker, a candlestick maker, or, one would assume, a prostitute, drug dealer, or porn star.

Hey, we're all fate's bitch in The Alchemist. But I digress. Boy seeks out his Personal Legend and finds it's a long, hard road to obtaining what you want in life.

But with faith, perseverance, and just a little goshdarnit good luck, the boy learns to speak the Language of the World and tap into The Soul of the World and fulfills his Personal Legend.

And what does he learn? That what he sought was back home, the place he started from. Oh, silly boy. So, in summation, here is what you should learn from The Alchemist : 1 Dream.

And, while you're at it, dream BIG 2 Follow your bliss 3 Don't be surprised if you find obstacles in your way, but you will overcome 4 It's good to travel and encounter people from other cultures 5 What we most often seek is right in front of us, but sometimes we have to leave home to realize it To all of these important life lessons, I can only say, "Well, no shit, Sherlock.

Alas, it's still crap. Cross posted at This Insignificant Cinder View all 58 comments. View all 18 comments.

His quest will lead him to riches far different—and far more satisfying—than he ever imagined. Santiago's journey teaches us about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, of recognizing opportunity and learning to read the omens strewn along life's path, and, most importantly, to follow our dreams.

It's the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting. But, I understand why people are so passionate in their dislike of this work.

Paul Coelho looks to inspire passion in people with The Alchemist. The Alchemist is a novel that combines an atmosphere of medieval mysticism with the voice of the desert -- dreams, symbols, signs, and adventure follow Santiago and the reader like echoes of ancient wise voices.

With this symbolic novel Coelho states that we should not avoid our destinies, and urges people to follow their dreams, because to find our "Personal Myth" and our mission on Earth is the way to find God, meaning happiness, fulfillment, and the ultimate purpose of creation.

The novel tells the tale of Santiago, a boy who has a dream and the courage to follow it. After listening to "the signs" the boy ventures in his personal, journey of exploration and self-discovery, searching for a hidden treasure located near the pyramids in Egypt.

In his journey, Santiago sees the greatness of the world, and meets all kinds of exciting people like kings and alchemists.

However, by the end of the novel, he discovers that "treasure lies where your heart belongs", and that the treasure was the journey itself, the discoveries he made, and the wisdom he acquired.

As the alchemist himself says when he appears to Santiago in the form of an old king "when you really want something to happen, the whole universe conspires so that your wish comes true".

This is the core of the novel's theme. Isn't it true that all of us want to believe the old king when he says that the greatest lie in the world is that at some point we lose the ability to control our lives, and become the pawns of fate.

Fear, fear of failure seems to be the greatest obstacle to happiness. This is where Coelho really captures the drama of man, who sacrifices fulfillment to conformity, who knows he can achieve greatness but denies doing so, and ends up living an empty shell of a life.

The Alchemist is a novel that will not appeal to everybody. Not everyone will identify with Santiago. We all have dreams, and are praying for somebody to tell us they can come true.

The novel skillfully combines words of wisdom, philosophy, and simplicity of meaning and language, and this is what makes it so enchanting.

View all 29 comments. This is either a beautifully written and fable-like illustration of simple and universal truths or a load of crap.

Similarly, the Credence Clearwater Revival song Looking Out My Backdo This is either a beautifully written and fable-like illustration of simple and universal truths or a load of crap.

Similarly, the Credence Clearwater Revival song Looking Out My Backdoor, a clunky but loveable country western tune, was actually begun as a facetious parody of slide guitar yokel lyricism.

Was it really so bad it was funny? If it was so obviously corny and insincere, was that not funny? Or was it?

Was he really wrestling women and then getting beaten up by Jerry Lawler? That was a joke right? Now … think about it for a second.

Was Coelho telling this straight or pulling our leg? I have to say that I doubt it, but I did laugh a few times and the over the top syrupy delivery made me wonder, and maybe I liked it better considering this twinkle of a third possibility.

I will say that this could go either way. I can absolutely see where someone could find hidden treasure and deeply meaningful messages in the short novel.

And I can see someone rolling their eyes and sticking their finger down their throat in a gag gesture. View all 59 comments.

Its all about following your dream and about taking the risk of following your dreams, which is actually so difficult to do and there are very few people in this world who actually do, I mean risk it all, just to follow your heart and your dream.

Also, he talks about a stage in our journey towards realizing our dreams, where everything just goes haywire and there is everything working against us and it almost takes us to the brink of abandoning everything and just getting back to what was so familiar and comfortable i.

The example given was really great and yes nothing new but we forget simple things in our life like "the darkest hour of the night is just before the dawn".

It is actually true that so many of us just leave the struggle when it gets really tough and the chips are really low, whereas actually we were so close to the objective, if only we would have had a little more patience we would have been there.

In one of the episodes he talks about death, yes the fact we always forget, the only reality about our life, it is a constant which is not going to change rest everything is uncertain.

Yes, and those who do think about death, mostly fear it, some fear death because of the physical pain attached to it such people actually fear the pain rather than the death, I am one of them and there are some who think they do not want to die because its not time yet for them to go.

Ironically but true, this decision about timings has thankfully not been left to us. So, how do we get over the fear of death or make it our friend, a companion?

And not waste our beautiful life worrying about dying all the time. One of the possible solutions lies in this book, it reads "if i have to fight, it will be just as good a day to die as any other".

Yes very much right, one would never know when he or she wakes up in the morning that if it was the last day of his or her life and in fact, that day would not be any different from all the other days already spent.

So, why not take everyday as the last day of our lives and live it up. Here, everyday can be the last day of my life, every meal can be my last, every call to my wife can be the last time I would hear her sweet and loving voice and the kids… Anyways, so what I personally follow is, everyday when I wake up or every time when I move out on an operation, I say to myself "what a beautiful day to die" and there on, I just do what I have to and what I have been taught in all these years in the army and go through all the motions and concentrate on the job at hand rather than worrying about my death and I am really at peace with the fear of death.

Another beautiful thought which I came across about death was in the novel by the author called "Confessions of a pilgrim".

I derived from it that death can be visualized as a beautiful person who is always sitting besides us, so close to us that it travels with us wherever we go and it also accompanies us to our bed.

Its a beautiful companion, a faithful companion, the only one who will never be unfaithful to us, rest all the companions are just lesser mortals and have been unfaithful at one point or other.

As per the Indian mythology, the soul never dies, it is indestructible, it only changes a body just like we change clothes. Our soul is a part of God and it goes back to him.

I firmly believe that there is no fiction involved in this story of the shepherd, but this is a true expression of mysteries and realities of our life, which we never pause to discover.

There is message that this book wants to convey to us!!! I have never been into writing anything ever in my life, yes not even a personal dairy, but since the time I actually started writing which was just a month back, I realized that if we just write our thoughts as they occur, the resultant has a touch of mystery, because what we wrote with all our heart and soul, sometimes tends to surprise us.

We tend to learn from what we ourselves wrote. It may sound crazy, may be the book has a effect that may appear really crazy but I am sure there are some people who would identify with me.

View all 32 comments. Preachy, pretentious, and awful portrayal of women. View all 27 comments. If books were pills, Alchemist would be a sugarcoated placebo with no real effect.

Let's call it a feel-good homily. I have never read a book as meretricious as this one. Early into his journey, he meets an old king named Melchizedek , or the king of Salem, who tells him to sell his sheep, so as to travel to Egypt, and introduces the idea of a Personal Legend.

Your Personal Legend "is what you have always wanted to accomplish. Everyone, when they are young, knows what their Personal Legend is.

Early in his arrival to Africa, a man who claims to be able to take Santiago to the pyramids instead robs him of what money he had made from selling his sheep.

Santiago then embarks on a long path of working for a crystal merchant so as to make enough money to fulfill his personal legend and go to the pyramids.

Along the way, the boy meets an Englishman who has come in search of an alchemist and continues his travels with his new companion.

When they reach an oasis, Santiago meets and falls in love with an Arabian girl named Fatima, to whom he proposes marriage. She promises to do so only after he completes his journey.

Frustrated at first, he later learns that true love will not stop nor must one sacrifice to it one's personal destiny, since to do so robs it of truth.

The boy then encounters a wise alchemist who also teaches him to realize his true self. Together, they risk a journey through the territory of warring tribes, where the boy is forced to demonstrate his oneness with "the soul of the world" by turning himself into a simoom before he is allowed to proceed.

When he begins digging within sight of the pyramids, he is robbed yet again, but accidentally learns from the leader of the thieves that the treasure he sought all along was in the ruined church where he had his original dream.

Coelho wrote The Alchemist in only two weeks in He explained that he was able to write at this pace because the story was "already written in [his] soul.

The book's main theme is about finding one's destiny , although according to The New York Times , The Alchemist is "more self-help than literature.

The Alchemist was first released by Rocco, [7] an obscure Brazilian publishing house. Albeit having sold "well," the publisher after a year decided to give Coelho back the rights.

Returning from the excursion, Coelho decided he had to keep on struggling [8] and was "so convinced it was a great book that [he] started knocking on doors.

In , a comic adaptation was published by Alexandre Jubran. In , a theatrical adaptation of The Alchemist was produced and performed in London.

In music, The Alchemist has inspired numerous bands of the same name. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

For similarly named works, see Alchemist disambiguation. Novel by Paulo Coelho. Dewey Decimal.

The novel tells the tale of Santiago, a boy who has a dream and the courage to follow it. I interpreted Novolines Tricks as a sign Casino Marrakech I must continue. View all 13 comments. Lists with This Book. I really disliked this book. I got halfway through it only to wind up on goodreads. It was enough for her Onlinw Casino wait for her man, knowing that he would Leider Nicht Gewonnen for her one day if he The Alchemist daft enough to get himself killed, die of thirst in the desert, forget her or just get bored of her. Sorry, your browser doesn't support embedded videos. Er reist zurück nach Andalusien, gräbt den Schatz aus und macht sich auf den Weg zu Fatima, um sie dann zu heiraten. Er vergisst dabei nicht, der Wahrsagerin den Zehnten zu überbringen. Sie ist begeistert! Sie ist begeistert! Zum Warenkorb Weiter einkaufen. Especially renowned for The Alchemist and Eleven Minutes, he has sold more than million copies worldwide and been translated into over 71 languages. Die sich überkreuzenden Träume stammen aus Slot Nuts seit dem hohen Mittelalter belegten, weit verbreiteten Erzählstoff Aarne-Thompson-Uther The book tells the story of Santiago, an Andalusian shepherd boy who dreams of travelling the world in search of a worldly treasure as fabulous as any ever found. Combining magic, mysticism, wisdom and wonder into an inspiring tale of self-​discovery, The Alchemist has become a modern classic, selling millions of copies​. Jetzt online bestellen! Heimlieferung oder in Filiale: Coelho, P: The Alchemist A Fable About Following Your Dream von Paulo Coelho | Orell Füssli: Der. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho continues to change the lives of its readers forever. With more than two million copies sold around the world, The Alchemist has. One day he finds the courage to follow his dreams into distant lands, each step galvanised by the knowledge that he is following the right path: his own. The.

The Alchemist Video

The Alchemist - Yacht Rock 2 In simple, unsophisticated prose, which seems to be carefully following the rubric of a Grade 6 descriptive writing Risiko Casino Online Spielen Kostenlos, I read: "The only things that concerned the sheep Bet Win Home food and water. Fear, fear of failure seems to be the greatest obstacle to happiness. View all 59 Kartenspiel Freecell. View all 29 comments. Other editions. View all comments.

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Der Kristallwarenhändler hat den Traum, nach Mekka zu pilgern, aber er hat sich so an sein eintöniges, tristes Leben gewöhnt, dass ihn nur noch der Traum am Leben hält. Er erzählt den Räubern von seinem Traum. Das Hörspiel ist als Doppel-CD erhältlich. In einer Karawane durch die Wüste lernt er einen jungen Engländer kennen, der auf der Suche nach einem Alchimisten ist, der ihn lehrt, Blei in Gold zu verwandeln. Beschreibung A special 25th anniversary edition of the extraordinary international bestseller, including a new Foreword by Paulo Coelho. Zurück in Hoffenheim Eintracht, veröffentlichte er Theaterstücke und provokative Rocksongs, die ihm über die Militarjunta der 70er Jahre dreimal Gefängnis einbrachten. Klappentext The Alchemist by Arma 3 Weapon Slots Coelho continues to change the lives of its readers forever. Bewertung verfassen. Seine Liebe zu The Alchemist wächst, fast möchte er seinen Traum aufgeben, um bei ihr bleiben zu können, aber der Alchimist ermuntert ihn, seinen persönlichen Weg weiterzugehen. Es geht dir, neben die fantastische Geschichte und mit Leben mit die Person, ein glauben in deine eigene Ziel im Leben.

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Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Alchemist. Really, I did this so you don't have to. Shelves: novellas.

My heart and I chatted, and we agreed, this book was short. My heart thinks it was also stupid, and after spending some time talking to the wind, I came to agree with my heart.

Yet, after beginning the journey with this book and despite the words of my heart, something impelled me to continue. Surely it had something to teach me?

The book had a lovely cover made of nicely textured stock that felt good in my hands. It offered the added efficiency of a fold-over flap--something that more publisher My heart and I chatted, and we agreed, this book was short.

It offered the added efficiency of a fold-over flap--something that more publishers should make an effort to do, as it makes the use of a bookmark superfluous.

In this case, this is especially true. The prose turned out to be not nearly as nicely textured. That is irony.

This book knows not of irony. Still, though, I needed to complete my journey. My heart tugged on my sleeve. As I continued my journey, I found that the text inside was set in a pleasing font.

I could find no typos, which are always a portent of doom. So I kept going. I found the words that the font expressed were simple and easy to read.

As I read them before falling to sleep each night, they neither challenged me nor troubled my dreams. Many people, I believe, enjoy this in a book, in the same way that they enjoy Hostess Twinkies.

They are filled up with calories, which causes their bodies to believe that they have been fed a nutritious meal, when in fact their brains are lulled into sheep-like somnambulism.

They grow fat and stupid er under the illusion that they have received nutrition without ever experiencing the pain of having to cook, and possibly work up a sweat or burn one's fingers.

I wondered if this book was possibly dangerous. I wondered what kind of people would be deluded into thinking, within the guise of a poorly written but deviously well-conceived parable, that this book's philosophy was, in fact, Deep and Meaningful Truth.

This book, I felt, was perhaps insidiously evil, a force with which I needed to do battle. I did not know which weapon to use, as irony appears to be rendered completely ineffective within a 3-metre radius of this book.

Still, irony and a love of absurdity hovered around me as I searched for the true meaning in this book, and why it appears to offer a powerful message to so many.

I consulted the Oracle, known across all the lands by many names. Now, there's an alchemist for you: Queen Wiki can turn knowledge into nonsense and then back again before your very eyes.

The perfect Oracle for this book. Queen Wiki turned out to be very entertaining and illuminating in this case. I learned that Joe Jonas and Russell Crowe loved this book.

I glommed on to this as an omen that absurdity was lurking close. I interpreted it as a sign that I must continue. Again, I was struck by the irony of that, but turning back to the book, this fleeting insight that might have had a grain of real value was immediately squelched.

I sipped some sweet tea from a crystal goblet, and plodded on through the desert of thought that is this book. This, I felt, was the lesson to be learned: in the Middle of the Centre of the Soul of the World, where blank-eyed acolytes are led like sheep?

Absurdity goes unrecognized. Skepticism is turned back at the gates by ill-formed philosophies based on the unwavering power of evangelical groupthink and our species' rather fascinating susceptibility to cognitive bias, or errors in thinking, that cause us to believe as truth that which can actually be scientifically validated as false.

This book makes a mockery of spirituality and the search for truth and meaning, under the guise of the easy, anxiety-quelling New Age philosophies that spoon-feed the stupid with Twitter-sized bites of nonsense.

Beliefs like, "good things happen to good people. If it's not right, it's not the end. Do not trade or give away--you'll just be spreading the bullshit.

My heart will go on. View all comments. I need to start this review by stating 1 I can't stand self-help books and 2 I'm a feminist no, I don't hate men- some men are quite awesome, but I am very conscious of women and our place in the world.

Short summary mild spoilers : A boy named Santiago follows his 'Personal Legend' in traveling from Spain to the Pyramids in Egypt searching for treasure.

Along the way, he learns 'the Language of the World' the 'Soul of the World' and discovers that the 'Soul of God' is 'his own soul. If you think they are hokey and silly, then you'll think this is a terrible book.

If you think statements such as "When you want something, all the universe conspires you to achieve it" and "All things are one" are moving and life-changing, you'll love this book.

If such statements have you rolling your eyes, then this isn't your cup of tea. Its not that I find anything wrong with these messages. They are important, but must be balanced with responsibility.

In my experience, 'following your dreams' or personal legend is not the only way toward wisdom and strength. Is the person who struggles to put food on the table every day for his or her family, consciously realizing that he or she may not be following his or her 'personal legend' any less heroic than some traveler who leaves everything and everyone he or she is responsible for to go on a spiritual quest?

Coelho comes close to labeling such people, as losers in life, which I find completely off the mark as some of these people have the most to offer in terms of wisdom.

The issue of responsibility is also part of this book's sexism. The main male characters in the novel have 'Personal Legends' - they are either seeking them, or have achieved them, or have failed to achieve them.

But Coelho never mentions 'Personal Legend' with regard to women, other than to say that Fatima, Santiago's fiance, is 'a part of Santiago's Personal Legend.

Instead of traveling to find her dreams, she is content to sit around, do chores, and stare everyday at the desert to wait for his return.

This is her 'fate' as a desert women. The fact that women don't have Personal Legends is even more galling considering the fact that according to Coelho, even minerals such as lead and copper have Personal Legends, allowing them to 'evolve' to something better ie, gold.

In the ideal world presented in THE ALCHEMIST, it seems that the job of men is to seek out their personal legends, leaving aside thoughts of family and responsibility, and its the job of women to let them, and pine for their return.

Of course, someone has to do the unheroic, inconvenient work of taking care of the children, the animals, the elderly, the ill If everyone simply goes off on spiritual quests, deciding they have no responsibility other than to seek their Personal Legends, no one would be taking responsibility for the unglamorous work that simply has to take place for the world to run.

On the other hand, what if both men and women are allowed to struggle towards their 'Personal Legends,' and help each other as best as they can towards them, but recognize that their responsibilities may force them to defer, compromise, or even 'sacrifice' their dreams?

This may seem depressing, but it isn't necessarily. Coelho seems to think that Personal Legends are fixed at childhood or at birth, or even before and are not changeable: they have to be followed through to the end, no matter how silly.

But in my experience, many people have chosen to adjust, compromise, and even 'give up' on their dreams, only to find that life grants them something better, or they have a new, better dream to follow, a path providing greater wisdom.

I really disliked this book. I dislike it in the way that I dislike a great deal of modern self help books. Their basic message is that if you want something to happen, you need to want it as hard as you can, without caring about anything else, not allowing yourself to doubt it, or let criticisms will get in the way then it will happen.

I disagree with this notion, not only because it is false, but because it is bad. Just because we desire something, does not make it good.

This idea of 'following I really disliked this book. This idea of 'following your heart' is often wrong. Who are we to be the arbiters of truth? Why should our hearts be sources of information that go beyond logic, doubt and reasoning?

Haven't we all desired things that have turned out to not be in our best interest, or to be harmful to others?

Andrew Jackson was a man known to have a lot of integrity. He was always 'true' to himself and followed his heart. Andrew Jackson is the man who initiated the 'Trail of Tears'.

Moving Native Americans from their homes and into reservations. Next, this idea of not letting ourselves doubt or consider doubts.

This is a terrible and dishonest way to live. If we don't consider doubts, and entertain them often, then we are deliberately blinding ourselves. Deliberately making ourselves ignorant.

If someone doesn't give serious consideration to the idea that they may be wrong. Give serious thought to why they believe what they do, and that perhaps those who doubt them may be correct, then they are behaving in a dangerous and dishonest way.

Not giving heed to the concerns doubts and criticisms of others is something I believe is a major fault in modern society.

Often, people fail to recognize the needs of the group and the community. We place so much emphasis on the needs and rights of the individual.

This causes people to focus so much on themselves to the detriment of others around them. At times, it can be beneficial to go against the group, but one should first give serious consideration to the groups concerns.

These are people who take a totally irrational stance, and stick to it as hard as they can in complete defiance to the views of everyone around them.

A good parable--like "The Prodigal Son"--should comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. The problem with this little book is that it does precisely the opposite.

Coelho's message--and, boy, is this a book with a message--is that each of us has his own Personal Legend, and that if we recognize that legend and pursue it sincerely, everything in the Universe which is after all made up--wind, stone, trees--of the same stuff we are will conspire to help us achieve it.

Corollaries: 1 peop A good parable--like "The Prodigal Son"--should comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable. Corollaries: 1 people who don't recognize their legends are never happy, 2 people who fail to realize their legends are afraid, and 3 people who refuse to pursue their legends, even when they know what they are, are both unhappy and afraid.

I admit I've left out a nuance or two here and there, but not many. There aren't more than three or four nuances in the book. I fear that the result of taking such a message seriously will be to make the successful even more self-satisfied, the narcissistic more self-absorbed, and the affluent more self-congratulatory.

At the same time, those who are unfortunate will blame themselves for their bad fortune, those who lack self-esteem will lose what little they have, and the poor will see--no, not God, as the beatitude says, but--the poor will see they have only themselves to blame.

Perhaps I am being too harsh. I can see how a few individual young persons, hemmed in by parental expectations and seeking their own paths, may find enough hope and courage here to help them venture forth.

But I am convinced the damage done by books like this--like The Secret , The Celestine Prophecy , and anything ever written by the late Dr.

Wayne Dyer or, for that matter, anything he may ever choose to channel from beyond the grave --is far greater than the little good they may achieve.

If you like parables, don't read this book. Go read a book of Hasidic tales collected by Martin Buber, a book of Sufi stories collected by Idries Shah, or a book of parables and sayings by Anthony de Mello instead.

Or then again, you could just try Jesus. Jesus is always good. I know that translation affects the quality of writing, but I could not get into this writing style.

At all. I felt like it was totally affected and contrived. The parable-like quality was totally contrived, and I thought the "moral" was pretty stupid.

Moral: everything you want and need is close to home. Take chances. Follow your "personal legacy. Granted, I am not religious.

I think god-fearing people get more out of this bc they can take that leap of faith, excuse the phrase.

If this was supposed to be a story of magic, I may have been into it. But it was supposed to be a simple story of knowing yourself.

And I think, philosophically speaking, when you truly know yourself that is when you truly realize your destiny. Why do you need supernatural forces to convey that message?

This was about realizing your destiny, or "personal legacy. In short, the book attempted to be deep and failed. A character simply called "boy" and short sentences doesn't make a story a fable.

Learning from your flocks and from nature doesn't make a character inexplicably wise. I really got nothing out of this book. It is short though.

The book came very highly recommended. Read it to judge the hype for yourself. After all, a whole nation, including Bill Clinton who I'm into , thought it was a touching account that personally changed them.

Then again, this is the same country who thought The Celestine Prophesy was worthwhile. Santiago's journey and spiritual quest, the people he meets, the dreams he has, the omens he encounters, and the nature he speaks to, are all things that we can relate to..

It is all about finding your Pe "when you really want something, the whole universe conspires in helping you to achieve it" This book has crossed the boundaries of books, and has taken a life of its own, creating a movement all around the globe.

It is all about finding your Personal Legend and pursuing your dream regardless of any hurdles, and about being spiritually connected to the universe, which is part of us, and part of God.

Reading this book always sets me back on the right path towards achieving the dreams I have put on hold. We always try to do what everyone expects of us like pursuing a career that you hate just because that is what everyone does.

It is maktub that Coelho writes this book, shares it with the world, and affect so many lives. This masterwork is a legend and a precious treasure.

View all 35 comments. Utter drivel. The book was badly written, righteous, condescending, preachy, and worst of all, the ending was morally questionable.

All the fables and stories are stolen from elsewhere, religious ideas and spirituality are badly mixed, and everything is so obvious. The book harps on about tapping into the Soul of the World, the Language of the World, about your one true path and other nonsense.

The basic idea is that if you really want something and "listen to your heart", the whole universe will Utter drivel. The basic idea is that if you really want something and "listen to your heart", the whole universe will help you achieve it if you only look for omens.

A questionable idea in a world where people no longer want to work hard and achieve independently. It reads like a really bad self-help book written for 8 year old children and disguised as a symbolic parable.

I read a lot of books and I can safely say this is the worst book I have ever read. It's only saving grace was that it was mercifully short. The problem with this book is not just that it's bad, which it certainly is, but that there are so many people out there who want to corner you at parties and tell you how it's totally changed their lives.

The profound lessons you'll learn from this book amount to nothing more than several variations on the theme of "only The problem with this book is not just that it's bad, which it certainly is, but that there are so many people out there who want to corner you at parties and tell you how it's totally changed their lives.

The profound lessons you'll learn from this book amount to nothing more than several variations on the theme of "only the very ugly is truly beautiful, only the very stupid are really intelligent, only black is white, only up is down" etc etc.

The writing is too simple to be really bad, but it's the content that gets you. By the end of the book you'll want to track down the philosopher's stone yourself and carefully beat Coelho to death with it.

I read this book about three years ago and just had to re-read it for book club. It was a steaming pile of crap then and, guess what?

The main reason I hate this book: it's trite inspirational literature dressed up as an adventure quest. You go into it thinking that it's going to be about a boy's quest for treasure.

If you read the back, there are words like "Pyramids," "Gypsy," "alchemist. It's Hallmark Hall of Fame territory set in an exotic locale.

Which pisses me off to no end as I normally try to dodge that sort of thing, but here it is masquerading as the type of book I normally like.

It's cliche, didactic, and poorly written. The Alchemist follows the journey of an Andalusian shepherd boy named Santiago. Believing a recurring dream to be prophetic , he asks a Gypsy fortune teller in the nearby town about its meaning.

The woman interprets the dream as a prophecy telling the boy that he will discover a treasure at the Egyptian pyramids. Early into his journey, he meets an old king named Melchizedek , or the king of Salem, who tells him to sell his sheep, so as to travel to Egypt, and introduces the idea of a Personal Legend.

Your Personal Legend "is what you have always wanted to accomplish. Everyone, when they are young, knows what their Personal Legend is.

Early in his arrival to Africa, a man who claims to be able to take Santiago to the pyramids instead robs him of what money he had made from selling his sheep.

Santiago then embarks on a long path of working for a crystal merchant so as to make enough money to fulfill his personal legend and go to the pyramids.

Along the way, the boy meets an Englishman who has come in search of an alchemist and continues his travels with his new companion. When they reach an oasis, Santiago meets and falls in love with an Arabian girl named Fatima, to whom he proposes marriage.

She promises to do so only after he completes his journey. Frustrated at first, he later learns that true love will not stop nor must one sacrifice to it one's personal destiny, since to do so robs it of truth.

The boy then encounters a wise alchemist who also teaches him to realize his true self. Together, they risk a journey through the territory of warring tribes, where the boy is forced to demonstrate his oneness with "the soul of the world" by turning himself into a simoom before he is allowed to proceed.

When he begins digging within sight of the pyramids, he is robbed yet again, but accidentally learns from the leader of the thieves that the treasure he sought all along was in the ruined church where he had his original dream.

Coelho wrote The Alchemist in only two weeks in He explained that he was able to write at this pace because the story was "already written in [his] soul.

The Alchemist Video

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